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Seacology Expeditions

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Seacology offers one-of-a-kind ecotourism adventures throughout the world’s islands.

When you join one of our expeditions, you won’t travel like an ordinary tourist. Instead, you’ll visit a Seacology project and meet local people. Most important, you’ll see how we’re making a difference, both by conserving island habitats and helping island communities.

With a small group of Seacology supporters, you’ll also explore unforgettable island environments, from the coral reefs of Fiji to the rainforests of Borneo. You’ll stay at luxury resorts and see amazing cultural sites. And depending on the destination, you’ll have opportunities to scuba dive, snorkel, hike, or kayak.

We will give Seacology Fellows the first chance to sign up for our trips. Then we’ll announce the expedition in our email updates and open it to everyone. (If you’re not on our email list, you can subscribe here.)

 

Upcoming Expeditions

Our next expedition will be to Malaysia, on the verdant island of Borneo, from August 13 to 23, 2020.

If you have questions about traveling with Seacology, contact us at islands@seacology.org or 510.559.3505.

Past Expeditions

Seacology has led dozens of trips to islands around the world, introducing hundreds of people to new cultures and helping them experience awe-inspiring landscapes and wildlife. Here are just a few highlights.

Chile

From mysterious, remote Rapa Nui (Easter Island) to the dramatic glaciers of Patagonia, this trip was full of wonders. On Quinchao Island, travelers saw how a new coastal reserve will protect endangered shorebirds.

Southeast Asia

In the mountains of Borneo, travelers saw spectacular protected rainforest and a micro-hydro facility, funded by Seacology, that supplies sustainable electricity. In the Philippines, they helped a restore coral reef near lush Palawan Island.

Madagascar

Rainforest, desert, wetland–Madagascar has it all. Ninety percent of its plants and animals are found nowhere else, and travelers on this expedition got to see a broad sample, from tiny chameleons to the world’s biggest lemur, the three-foot tall indri.