Puncak Baru Village

June 2016

Conservation benefit: Preservation of 2,325 acres of forest for 15 years

Community benefit: Repair of community freshwater supply system

The rainforests of West Java are home to many endemic and endangered species: the Javan gibbon, Javan surili, Javan hawk-eagle, and Javan leopard, just to name a few. Their survival is in peril because the island is densely populated, and it’s estimated that today only about five percent of its original habitat remains.

The people of Puncak Baru Village have offered to protect 2,335 acres of forest near their village. No logging, farming, or hunting will be allowed.

The community will use Seacology’s help to rebuild a 2,000-meter section of its water supply system. The community members, realizing the role of forest cover in controlling erosion and shading streams, will also plant trees along the length of the water supply channels. (Like other traditional community irrigation systems in Indonesia, this system uses trenches, not pipes.) Puncak Baru’s system is built on a hillside and every rainy season, landslides destroy sections of the channel; the constant repairs are a financial drain on the village and make the system inefficient.

The system provides water for drinking, cooking, and bathing, as well as for irrigation of the village’s rice fields. Ensuring a clean, adequate supply of freshwater is always a concern in Indonesia, but climatic conditions have made the situation especially difficult now. Severe drought struck last year, and then El Niño delayed the start of the rainy season and reduced overall rainfall. The resulting water shortages threaten food security and increase the risk of illness from unsafe water sources.

Project Updates
January 2017
Community members have repaired 1.5 kilometers of the freshwater canal and will finish the rest after the rice-planting season. They are now planting trees along the sides of the canal.

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